Doctor Fortran in “Think, Thank, Thunk”

One of the various responsibilities I have is for the compiler samples (both Fortran and C++).  For Intel Visual Fortran, we have a lot of samples – for the other compilers, fewer.  The Windows Fortran samples are a mixed lot; some came to us from Microsoft Fortran Powerstation (with or without extensive modification) and some were developed by us (mostly, yours truly.)

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Doctor Fortran in “I’ve Come Here For An Argument, Side 2”

My earlier post, “I’ve Come Here For An Argument”, was very popular with my fellow support engineers, as it provided a convenient answer to questions they frequently receive.  (For me too, which in part is why I wrote it!) But some people (cough, Ron, cough) are never satisfied, and I’ve been asked to write a follow-up on what else can go wrong when you don’t understand all of Fortran’s argument-passing rules.  So, here we go…

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Doctor Fortran in “Too Much of a Good Thing?”

A lot of Fortran programmers take the “belt and suspenders” approach to coding, with explicit declarations of every attribute they want for a symbol. In general, this is good practice, especially when combined with IMPLICIT NONE to force you to say what you mean. But some programmers take this a bit too far and it gets them into trouble. Let’s look at some cases…

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What happens in Vegas…

110 degrees in the shade, 9 Fortran geeks and dozens of comments and complaints about Fortran: it must be another J3 meeting in Las Vegas!   J3 is the US Fortran Standards Technical Committee, a subcommittee of the International Committee for Information Technology Standards (INCITS).  J3 works closely with the International Fortran Standards Committee (ISO/IEC/JTC1/SC22/WG5) and is responsible for developing the content of Fortran standards.

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Dick Hustvedt, the consummate software engineer

I’ve written a couple of “farewell” posts before, but this one is personal. I learned today that Dick Hustvedt died last week, and my heart is heavy. As I knew him, Dick was one of the principal architects and developers of the VAX/VMS operating system and a major force behind the development of the VAXcluster.

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Doctor, it hurts when I do this!

It is often said that you can write bad code in any language, and I certainly can’t argue with that. I do find, though, that the worst-looking code comes from programmers who are more familiar with another programming language. One can often tell that a C programmer wrote Fortran code, or that a Fortran programmer wrote C code (my C code probably looks like the latter.)

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